The Pen as an Archeological Oddity


we are unable inexpressible   /           repression filled          high-(non)-functional             humans

there’s a change in perception

this abrupt       shift                in worlds has happened before,        but it’s drastic now

the way the pen rests on a table,       horizontally

beckoning, enticing our former species

it’s not that we have broken hands but broken minds

they’re see-through in order to view                                                 ink deplete gradually

the pen, an instrument of serenity                 in that even the                       motion

the gyration of the wrist

causes tiny muscles to stretch and constrict

possessed by the pen

yet all of that is only memory            now, perhaps that feeling of oneness

with the inanimate is              just a ploy of our desire,                     our half-artificial brains

lusting primitivism again

or rather hands                       that beckon                             to be of use

we are not       glorifying a utilitarian                                                 object

applying          ink to page     via gravity

nothing less yet           there’s something more about this that cannot be expressed

when we see   the pen in our new minds       physicality isn’t there

more   like a   medium

                                                to

                                                            be

About Sean William Lynch
Sean William Lynch is a poet from New Jersey who was born in 1992. Lynch's first book of poems "the city of your mind" was published in 2013 by Whirlwind Press. Frank Sherlock, the poet laureate of Philadelphia, called Lynch's debut poetry book "visionary." CA Conrad claimed that the book was "marvelous!" S.W. Lynch's writing has been featured in numerous publications online and in print, including Milkfist, Poetry Quarterly, and Tincture Journal.

2 Responses to The Pen as an Archeological Oddity

  1. pembroke5 says:

    Great white space poem. You really have the common touch, the ability to write about things that are relevant to peoples’ own experiences. It seems that no one can have enough high tech skills or enough credentials these days. It’s what Toynbe calls a change in technic, some kind of vast change that leaves most people behind. Alexander Marshall pembroke5@aol.com

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